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“If you intend something to happen, it happens, if you intend it to happen. Verbalization* is not the intention. The intention is the carrier wave which takes the verbalization along with it.” — L. Ron Hubbard(*verbalization: expressing oneself in words.)

When you use the correct level of intention in your communication, people pay attention to you For example, you are in a busy clothing store and need a clerk’s help. With poor intention, you might wait all day. But with strong intention, you look at the clerk, his head whips around and he asks if he can help you.

When you add firm intention to your communication, you get better results.

For example, if you tell your children to clean up their rooms with weak intention, they continue to play around. If you tell them to clean their rooms with strong intention, they clean their rooms.

Intention at Work

Your job is easier when you use the correct amount of intention.

For example, a coworker named Chris likes to complain to you. Chris says, “I hate this crappy chair.” “This weather is horrible.” “Oh no, here comes Mr. Big again.”

Tolerating or avoiding Chris resolves nothing. Your workplace remains stressful.

Yet if you look Chris in the eye and say, “Chris, stop complaining,” you enjoy some wonderful results – if your intention is strong enough. It does not matter how loudly or softly you speak as verbalization has nothing to do with it. Your intention powers your statement.

A salesperson, with a strong intention to sell, gets more sales. A service representative, with a strong intention to make customers happy, makes customers happy. A job applicant, with a strong intention to land the job, gets the job.

A manager with poor intention gets little cooperation and eventually fails. However, a manager with strong intention, finds that his or her employees usually do what they were hired to do.

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